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October 22, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)—Families in thirty-three states are better off under one or more key child care policies in 2014 than in 2013, but have lost ground in thirteen states, according to a report released today by the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC). The state-by-state report, Turning the Corner: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2014, examines five critical factors that determine the affordability, accessibility and quality of assistance for all fifty states and the District of Columbia.

The report marks the second year in a row in which NWLC found that the situations for families improved under child care policies in more states than it worsened, demonstrating a turnaround from previous years. However, many of these improvements were modest, and too many families still cannot receive the help they need to obtain reliable, high-quality care. For example, only one state pays child care providers who serve families receiving child care assistance at the federally recommended reimbursement rate, and long waiting lists prevent low-income families in many states from getting assistance at all.  

October 16, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)  Data released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau show that the rate of poverty among Americans 65 and older is dramatically higher—54 percent—under the more comprehensive Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) than the Census Bureau’s official poverty measure. Over 6.5 million seniors—more than one in seven—cannot afford to meet their basic needs after paying medical expenses.  The child poverty rate is 19 percent lower under the SPM than under the official poverty measure because the SPM counts income from additional safety net programs—but the child poverty rate is still higher than for any other age group.

Our Impact

A coach in Birmingham, Alabama, Roderick Jackson was not afraid to speak his mind. When he witnessed the inferior practice and game conditions provided for his girls’ high school basketball team, compared to those provided for the boys, he complained to school administrators, calling it as he saw it: unfair sex discrimination.

I worked at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company for close to two decades. I was paid less than my male co-workers the entire time—even though I was doing the same work they were and doing it well. Near the end of my time there, I received an anonymous note alerting me to the discrimination, and I decided to fight for justice, with the help of the National Women's Law Center and its allies.

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Families in thirty-three states were better off—having greater access to child care assistance to help pay for care and/or receiving greater benefits from assistance—in February 2014 than in February 2013 under one or more key child care assistance policies, according to a new report by the National Women’s Law Center. 

I recently needed my old movie fix, so I popped in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window. The main character's debatably obsessive watch on his neighbors begs the audience (and characters) to question the line between private and public space and personal responsibility over other’s lives. I was frustrated by the implication that the female body is this public space that is totally fine to spy on without obtaining consent while simultaneously representing a space that should not be defended when violated. 

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To enable parents to have the #ChildCare they need, we will need further policy improvements & investments: http://t.co/WuywSXDbr0
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