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October 16, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)  Data released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau show that the rate of poverty among Americans 65 and older is dramatically higher—54 percent—under the more comprehensive Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) than the Census Bureau’s official poverty measure. Over 6.5 million seniors—more than one in seven—cannot afford to meet their basic needs after paying medical expenses.  The child poverty rate is 19 percent lower under the SPM than under the official poverty measure because the SPM counts income from additional safety net programs—but the child poverty rate is still higher than for any other age group.

October 03, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)  Women’s unemployment rate was higher than men’s for first time since December 2012, according to new analysis by the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) of data released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Our Impact

I worked at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company for close to two decades. I was paid less than my male co-workers the entire time—even though I was doing the same work they were and doing it well. Near the end of my time there, I received an anonymous note alerting me to the discrimination, and I decided to fight for justice, with the help of the National Women's Law Center and its allies.

Chris Turner

We helped pass landmark health care reform legislation and end insurers’ practices of charging women higher premiums than men, excluding coverage for maternity care and treating domestic violence and Cesarean sections as pre-existing conditions.

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Last week, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott defended a restrictive law by saying, “[T]he vast majority of Texans” still live “within comfortable driving distance (150 miles)” of an abortion clinic. In commenting on women who live in more rural areas, Mr. Abbott promised, “Abortion can be accessed by driving approximately 230–250 miles — an inconvenience, but still a manageable one.” Let’s take a hypothetical low-income woman from the Rio Grande area — Ms. Smith — and examine just how “manageable of an inconvenience” it would be for her to get an abortion.

For anyone who thinks that poverty among seniors is a thing of the past, the data released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau should serve as a wake-up call. Under the Census Bureau’s more comprehensive Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM), the rate of poverty among Americans 65 and older is 54 percent higher than under the official poverty measure (14.6 percent v. 9.5 percent). Over 6.5 million seniors—more than one in seven—cannot afford to meet their basic needs.

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How does your state stack up when it comes to scheduling protections for workers? http://t.co/sgNVi86aZm #SchedulesThatWork
2 hours 19 min ago
For anyone who thinks that #poverty among seniors is a thing of the past, we've got data that says otherwise: http://t.co/cXfOReQDwO
3 hours 24 min ago
Everyone deals with inconveniences in life. But driving 100s of miles to get an abortion is more than "inconvenient." http://t.co/cyoDbXti5s
4 hours 29 min ago