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March 27, 2015

(Washington, D.C.)  The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) extends its sincere appreciation and thanks to Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), who today announced he would retire from the Senate next year, after a more than 30-year tenure.

 The following is a statement by NWLC Co-Presidents Nancy Duff Campbell and Marcia D. Greenberger:

“The National Women’s Law Center is grateful for Sen. Reid’s strong and dedicated leadership on issues important to women and families, and his work to advance equality, opportunity and fairness for all. We salute his leadership on major issues, including access to health care through his support of the Affordable Care Act, access to justice by securing the confirmation of a record number of women judges from diverse backgrounds, equal pay protection through the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, and promoting measures to increase tax fairness, protect Social Security, and strengthen protections against sexual violence.

March 25, 2015

(Washington, D.C.)  Today, in a 6-3 decision in Young v UPS, the Supreme Court reversed the decision of the Fourth Circuit and remanded Peggy Young’s case for further proceedings.

The following is a statement by Marcia D. Greenberger, Co-President of the National Women’s Law Center:

“Today’s Supreme Court decision is an important victory for Peggy Young and pregnant workers everywhere.

“The Court has put employers on notice: pregnancy is not a reason to discriminate. The Court said that if you accommodate most non-pregnant workers who need it but not most pregnant workers who need it, you may be found guilty of violating the Pregnancy Discrimination Act. 

Our Impact

A coach in Birmingham, Alabama, Roderick Jackson was not afraid to speak his mind. When he witnessed the inferior practice and game conditions provided for his girls’ high school basketball team, compared to those provided for the boys, he complained to school administrators, calling it as he saw it: unfair sex discrimination.

As a law student at American University, Grace Pazdan learned that students were being denied prescription contraceptive coverage under the University’s mandatory student health plan, when virtually all other prescription drugs were covered. Grace and her fellow students contacted the NWLC and began organizing a grass roots campaign to raise awareness of this discrimination.

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Cross-posted from ACSLaw's blog

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court delivered an important victory for pregnant workers [PDF] when in a 6-3 ruling it revived Peggy Young’s pregnancy discrimination case against UPS and sent it back to the lower courts for further proceedings. In so ruling, the Supreme Court declined UPS’s invitation to read a key piece of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act completely out of the statute books. 

Reports have surfaced this week that Senator Murray (D-WA) is looking to introduce a bill that would raise the federal minimum wage to $12 an hour by 2020. She’d also “like to see the separate tipped [minimum cash] wage abolished altogether,” and her proposal would include an indexing measure to ensure that the value of the minimum wage does not erode in the future.

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Our courts should reflect the diversity of the nation they preside over. One way to achieve that: add more women: http://t.co/1pfSTdWVVy
9 hours 25 min ago
An unconstitutional Ohio bill would place politics above women's health — again: http://t.co/eOyqIlNFny
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Raising the #minimumwage can also improve the overall economy, with widespread benefits for working families: http://t.co/xBlJWtYHzr
14 hours 35 min ago