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Child Care Assistance Policies Improve in 33 States, But Still Fall Short in Helping Families, New NWLC Report Finds

October 22, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)—Families in thirty-three states are better off under one or more key child care policies in 2014 than in 2013, but have lost ground in thirteen states, according to a report released today by the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC). The state-by-state report, Turning the Corner: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2014, examines five critical factors that determine the affordability, accessibility and quality of assistance for all fifty states and the District of Columbia.

The report marks the second year in a row in which NWLC found that the situations for families improved under child care policies in more states than it worsened, demonstrating a turnaround from previous years. However, many of these improvements were modest, and too many families still cannot receive the help they need to obtain reliable, high-quality care. For example, only one state pays child care providers who serve families receiving child care assistance at the federally recommended reimbursement rate, and long waiting lists prevent low-income families in many states from getting assistance at all.  

More Than 6.5 Million Seniors Can’t Afford To Meet Basic Needs, Supplemental Poverty Measure Shows

October 16, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)  Data released this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau show that the rate of poverty among Americans 65 and older is dramatically higher—54 percent—under the more comprehensive Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) than the Census Bureau’s official poverty measure. Over 6.5 million seniors—more than one in seven—cannot afford to meet their basic needs after paying medical expenses.  The child poverty rate is 19 percent lower under the SPM than under the official poverty measure because the SPM counts income from additional safety net programs—but the child poverty rate is still higher than for any other age group.

Sarah Silverman and Droga5 Create $30 Trillion Crowdfunding Campaign For National Women’s Law Center To Close The Wage Gap

October 8, 2014

New York, NY  – Comedian Sarah Silverman and creative agency Droga5, co-creators of “The Great Schlep,” have reunited to create a new campaign, which launched today, to help close the wage gap between men and women. The National Women’s Law Center, a non-profit organization educating the public about the wage gap and advocating for equal pay, will receive monies raised through the video and crowdfunding initiative.  

The Equal Payback Project is designed to raise awareness about an issue that has persisted for decades and encourage supporters to donate to the cause. The fundraising goal is $29,811,746,430,000 – a ludicrous goal, to be sure, but one highlighting the real numbers; the figure was calculated by multiplying the nearly 69 million working women by the $435,049 a typical woman loses to the wage gap over the course of her career (assuming she works full time, year round for 40 years).

Women’s Unemployment Rate Higher Than Men’s For First Time in Nearly Two Years, NWLC Analysis Shows

October 3, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)  Women’s unemployment rate was higher than men’s for first time since December 2012, according to new analysis by the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) of data released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

NWLC Applauds Senate Bill That Ensures Access to Emergency Contraception in Health Care Providers’ Offices and Emergency Rooms

September 23, 2014

(Washington, D.C.) Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), along with four cosponsors, has introduced the Emergency Contraception Access and Education Act (S.2876), which will ensure that survivors of sexual assault get the information, counseling and access to emergency contraception they need in emergency rooms and that all women get information and counseling about emergency contraception during their doctors’ visits.

Barriers Rooted in Race and Gender Bias Harm Educational Outcomes of African American Girls and Must Be Addressed, New Report Shows

September 23, 2014

(Washington, D.C.) Due to pervasive, systemic barriers in education rooted in racial and gender bias and stereotypes, African American girls are faring worse than the national average for girls on almost every measure of academic achievement, according to a comprehensive report released today by the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) and the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF). In sharp contrast to reports of the academic success of girls overall, African American girls are more likely than any other group of girls to get poor grades and be held back a grade.

The report, Unlocking Opportunity for African American Girls: A Call to Action for Educational Equity, outlines what are sometimes insurmountable barriers to staying in school and how poor educational outcomes result in limited job opportunities, lower lifetime earnings, and increased risk of economic insecurity for African American women. In 2013, 43 percent of African American women without a high school diploma were living in poverty, compared to nine percent of African American women with at least a bachelor's degree.

NWLC Files Eleventh Circuit Court Brief in Case Against Alabama Middle School for Subjecting Eighth-Grade Girl to Sexual Harassment and Assault by Male Student

September 18, 2014

(Washington, D.C.) The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) said today that it has filed a brief in the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit with co-counsel Mastando & Artrip, LLC against Madison County School Board and school officials in Alabama for their outrageous response to student-on-student sexual harassment that resulted in the rape of a 14-year-old girl. The case stems from a policy at Sparkman Middle School of only punishing sexual harassment if a student was “caught in the act" through witnesses, an admission, or physical evidence. Based on this policy, school officials failed to effectively address repeated sexual harassment of multiple female students by a male student. When the 14-year-old girl complained about this older male student asking her to meet him in the bathroom for sex, school officials sent her to meet him in the bathroom as bait in a sting operation to "catch him in the act.” Before any staff arrived, the girl was raped by the male student. 

NWLC Applauds House Introduction of Bill that Ensures that Women Who Rely on the Military for Health Care Get Comprehensive Contraceptive Coverage and Counseling

September 17, 2014

 (Washington, D.C.) Today, Representative Jackie Speier, along with 58 original cosponsors, introduced the Access to Contraception for Women Servicemembers and Dependents Act, a critical piece of legislation that will ensure that all women who rely on the military for health care receive comprehensive contraceptive coverage and counseling. The legislation, a companion bill to S. 2687, will give these women equal access to the same comprehensive birth control coverage, education and counseling at no cost to them that other federal employees and tens of millions of other women now enjoy, thanks to the Affordable Care Act. The bill also ensures that all servicemembers receive comprehensive family planning education and the information they need to plan if and when to have a child.

No Improvement in Women’s Poverty Rate; One in Seven Women Lives in Poverty, Says NWLC

September 16, 2014

(Washington, D.C.)  Nearly 18 million women lived in poverty last year and there was no improvement in the poverty rate for women, although the overall poverty rate and the poverty rate for children declined, according to an analysis by the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) of data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.

House Will Vote to Reauthorize Child Care and Development Block Grant, Making Safe, Stable Child Care a Priority

September 15, 2014

(Washington, D.C.) Tonight, the House is expected to vote and pass the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014 (CCDBG), which will improve health and safety standards of child care facilities, make it easier for families to get and continue to receive help paying for child care, and support training and professional development of child care providers.