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Federal Appellate Court Rules in Favor of Girl Raped as Part of Sting Operation Orchestrated by School Officials

Federal Appellate Court Rules in Favor of Girl Raped as Part of Sting Operation Orchestrated by School Officials

Yesterday, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit issued a unanimous decision in favor of the female plaintiff who was raped as an eighth grader by a male student in an Alabama middle school in the case Hill v. Madison County School Board. The Court's decision gives a green-light to the young woman to proceed to trial with her claim that the school's outrageous response to her student-on-student sexual harassment  resulted in her rape and violated her rights under Title IX and the U.S. Constitution. The National Women's Law Center represented the plaintiff together with co-counsel Mastando & Artrip, LLC, arguing against the school board and school officials and urging today's result. The U.S. Department of Justice also filed a friend-of-the-court brief supporting the plaintiff.

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National Women’s Law Center Files Federal Court Appeal in Sexual Assault Case
September 17, 2014

The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) and the Alabama law firm Mastando & Artrip, LLC have filed an appeal with the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in a lawsuit against the Madison County School Board and its officials for violating Title IX, the U.S. Constitution, and state law.  The case alleges that the Defendants did not properly respond to a long pattern of sexual harassment by a male student, and instead arranged for a 14-year-old female student to meet him in the bathroom in order to catch him in the act of harassment so that he could be punished.  The female student was raped by the male student in the bathroom before anyone arrived to catch him.

Equal Pay for African American Women

African American women who work full-time, year round are paid just 64 cents for every dollar a White, non-Hispanic male makes. This wage gap knows no bounds—African American women make less than white, non-Hispanic men even when you control for factors such as their education level, age, or occupation. This fact sheet explains it all.

Recently Introduced and Enacted State and Local Fair Scheduling Legislation

Employees increasingly face just-in-time scheduling practices, including being given very little notice of their work schedules, being sent home early when work is slow without being paid for their scheduled shifts, and being assigned to call-in shifts or on-call shifts that require them to call their employer or wait to be called by their employer, often within two hours of their potential shift, to find out whether they will be required to report to work. In addition, many employees have very little ability to make adjustments to their work schedules without penalty. More than a third of parents say they have been “passed over” for a promotion, a raise, or a new job due to a need for a flexible work schedule. Among low-wage workers, about half report having little flexibility in the hours that they work.

There is a growing movement to improve workplace scheduling practices so that workers and their families can better plan their lives. In the past year, lawmakers have introduced legislation at the federal, state and local level to respond to these difficult scheduling practices. In 2014, San Francisco passed a Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights. The Ordinance provides scheduling protections for employees in certain types of jobs. Also in 2014, Michigan introduced a bill modeled after the federal scheduling legislation that was introduced earlier that same year, the Schedules That Work Act. And in 2015, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York and Oregon introduced bills to curb difficult scheduling practices. This fact sheet provides an overview of this recently enacted and proposed state and local legislation.

Reports & Toolkits

July 21, 2015
For fifty years, Medicaid has provided low-income women with essential health insurance coverage. Medicaid covers a comprehensive range of services – birth control, maternity care, prescription drugs, hospitalization, long-term care, and more – that addresses women’s major health needs throughout their lives. Women of all ages and health circumstances rely on Medicaid to pay for their health care, and a growing body of research has demonstrated how important Medicaid coverage is to enrollees’ access to care, overall health, and mortality rates.
June 12, 2015
The Supreme Court’s decision in Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties v. Burwell has been misused and expanded in ways that sanction discrimination in areas beyond birth control coverage. This report cites more than 10 examples to demonstrate how the Hobby Lobby decision and the law underlying it – the Religious Freedom Restoration Act – have been to misused in attempts to shirk legal obligations, from refusing to comply with non-discrimination laws to resisting vaccination requirements.

Fact Sheets

September 01, 2015

Nearly 28 million employees—almost one in five—work part time. Part-time employees are especially likely to be female and earn low wages. Millions of those in part-time jobs work part time not because they want to, but because they cannot get full-time work. Others have to work part time to accommodate school or family obligations. Part-time employees frequently make less per hour for the same work, lack access to important workplace benefits, are denied promotion opportunities, and are subject to abusive scheduling practices.

August 27, 2015

Fifteen states and the District of Columbia have passed laws to explicitly grant pregnant employees the right to reasonable accommodations at work. Ten of these laws have been passed since 2013, all with bipartisan support, and in the majority of cases with unanimous or near-unanimous support. Although the details of the laws vary from state to state, they share a core principle: a pregnant worker with a medical need for accommodation should not be pushed out of work when she can be reasonably accommodated without imposing an undue hardship on the employer. These laws affirm that no one should be forced to choose between the health of her pregnancy and her paycheck.

Legal Briefs & Testimony

August 13, 2015

Federal Appellate Court Rules in Favor of Girl Raped as Part of Sting Operation Orchestrated by School Officials

Yesterday, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit issued a unanimous decision in favor of the female plaintiff who was raped as an eighth grader by a male student in an Alabama middle school in the case Hill v. Madison County School Board. The Court's decision gives a green-light to the young woman to proceed to trial with her claim that the school's outrageous response to her student-on-student sexual harassment  resulted in her rape and violated her rights under Title IX and the U.S. Constitution. The National Women's Law Center represented the plaintiff together with co-counsel Mastando & Artrip, LLC, arguing against the school board and school officials and urging today's result. The U.S. Department of Justice also filed a friend-of-the-court brief supporting the plaintiff.

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National Women’s Law Center Files Federal Court Appeal in Sexual Assault Case
September 17, 2014

The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) and the Alabama law firm Mastando & Artrip, LLC have filed an appeal with the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in a lawsuit against the Madison County School Board and its officials for violating Title IX, the U.S. Constitution, and state law.  The case alleges that the Defendants did not properly respond to a long pattern of sexual harassment by a male student, and instead arranged for a 14-year-old female student to meet him in the bathroom in order to catch him in the act of harassment so that he could be punished.  The female student was raped by the male student in the bathroom before anyone arrived to catch him.

July 31, 2015

On July 21, 2015, the National Women's Law Center submitted comments in strong support of the Department of Labor's (DOL's) conflict of interest rule proposal.

Coalition Action Materials

August 05, 2015

The budget passed by Congress in May 2015 would cut nearly $5 trillion over the next decade from programs that help families protect their health, make ends meet, give their children a chance at a better life, and strengthen our communities and our nation.

July 20, 2015

This toolkit provides the resources advocates and community leaders need to talk to their leaders about the importance of investing in early childhood education over the August recess.

Download the toolkit.

Webinars & Presentations

Below are resources related to past NWLC webinars, conference calls and other presentations. Please see our list of upcoming calls & webinars.

 

July 22, 2015

This webinar, co-hosted by NWLC and CLASP,  covers critical information about the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) reauthorization law currently being implemented by states looking -closely at provisions of the new CCDBG law that most impact low-wage workers

July 21, 2015

This call focuses on the current situation regarding appropriations/funding for early learning, the impact of caps on spending for this year and on future funding, and messages for Members of Congress during the August recess.