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Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy

Julie Vogtman

Julie Vogtman is Director of Income Support Policy and Senior Counsel for the Family Economic Security Program at the National Women's Law Center. She works on a range of issues involving economic support for low-income women and their families, including minimum wage policies, unemployment benefits, and child care assistance. She also contributes to the Center’s work on federal budget and tax policies. Prior to joining the Center in 2010, Ms. Vogtman was an associate with Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, DC. She is a graduate of Furman University and Georgetown University Law Center.

My Take

Behind the Numbers: Poverty

On September 16, 2015, the Census Bureau will release new national data on poverty, income, and health insurance in the U.S. in 2014. As we get ready to crunch numbers, we thought it would be helpful to take a deeper look at what these numbers tell us—and don’t tell us—about poverty. We’ll get a somewhat fuller picture because for the first time, on the same date, the Census Bureau will be releasing data on poverty using two different measures: the “official” poverty measure and the “supplemental” poverty measure.” Here are a few FAQs on poverty and the Census Bureau data.

What does the official poverty rate measure?

The official poverty rate measures the percentage of the U.S. population with income below the federal poverty threshold, often referred to as the “poverty line,” for their family size (e.g., $24,008 in 2014 for a family of four with two kids). Income is calculated before taxes and includes only cash income such as earnings, pension/retirement income, Social Security, unemployment benefits, and child support payments.


Let's Raise Our (Spending) Caps for Women and Families

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: September 10, 2015 at 02:17 pm

It’s the week after Labor Day, and to be honest, it’s one of my least favorite times of year in D.C. Summer vacation is over but it’s still 90 degrees outside, traffic is a nightmare, and Congress is back in town—and everyone on and around Capitol Hill seems to be placing bets on whether we’re just a few weeks away from a government shutdown.  

A shutdown, of course, is what we’ll get if Congress doesn’t pass legislation to keep the government funded when the new fiscal year begins October 1st. And unless that legislation stops the deep budget cuts known as the “sequester” (cuts that were mitigated in FY 2014 and 2015 by the “Ryan-Murray deal”), the sequester will be back and worse than ever in FY 2016.


An Important Victory in the Fight for $15

While tomorrow will mark six years since the federal minimum wage last went up, Fight for 15 activists are celebrating a big win in New York.

A panel appointed by New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo recommended yesterday that the minimum wage be raised for employees of fast-food chain restaurants to $15 an hour over the next few years. Their proposal calls for the minimum wage to go up to $10.50 in New York City and $9.75 in the rest of the state by Dec. 31, then increase gradually each year to reach $15 in New York City by the end of 2018 and in the rest of the state by July 1, 2021. It is expected that the labor commissioner, Mario Musolino, will accept and implement their recommendation.


Raise the Wage for Millions of Women of Color

This week marks six years since the federal minimum wage last went up—and the tipped minimum wage has been unchanged for more than a generation. NWLC, along with the National Council of La Raza and the National Urban League, just released two new analyses highlighting why increasing the minimum wage is especially important for Latinas and African American women.

Here are six key facts you need to know:


Minimum Wage Update: State & Local Highlights

Big news out of California this week: the Los Angeles City Council voted 13-1 on Wednesday to adopt a plan that will raise the city’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2020, boosting pay for more than 40 percent of the workforce in the country’s second-largest city. (The ordinance will require another procedural vote next week before being sent to Mayor Eric Garcetti, who supports the measure.) The minimum wage statewide—currently $9 per hour and scheduled to reach $10 in 2016—could also go higher if the Assembly approves a bill passed by the state Senate this week that would raise California's minimum wage to $11 next year and to $13 in 2017.