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Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy

Julie Vogtman is Director of Income Support Policy and Senior Counsel for the Family Economic Security Program at the National Women's Law Center. She works on a range of issues involving economic support for low-income women and their families, including minimum wage policies, unemployment benefits, and child care assistance. She also contributes to the Center’s work on federal budget and tax policies. Prior to joining the Center in 2010, Ms. Vogtman was an associate with Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, DC. She is a graduate of Furman University and Georgetown University Law Center.

My Take

Minimum Wage Rates Go Up In 20 States to start 2015, Increasing Wages for More than 3.1 Million Workers

The minimum wage went up in 20 states on January 1st. South Dakota had the largest boost of $1.25 per hour thanks to South Dakota voters, who overwhelmingly approved the wage increase on the state’s ballot in November. Arkansas and Nebraska also saw their minimum wages increase on the 1st as a result of successful ballot initiatives, while workers in Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and West Virginia got raises due to legislative action. Minimum wages in the other nine states—Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, and Washington—increased automatically because they are indexed to inflation, a policy that ensures the minimum wage keeps pace with the rising cost of living. Workers in Alaska, D.C., Delaware and Minnesota are set to get raises later in 2015.

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The Budget Battles in Lame Duck: What’s at Stake for Women and Families

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: November 12, 2014 at 09:17 am

After a long election recess, Congress returns today—and Members have plenty of work to do in the lame duck session before the newly elected Congress takes over in January. The headline-making issues on the congressional agenda include Ebola and ISIS, but Congress’s response to these exceptional threats will likely be tied to its approach to a more basic task: keeping the federal government running.

Because Congress did not pass any FY 2015 appropriations bills before the recess, it approved a continuing resolution (CR) to keep the government operating at FY 2014 funding levels when the new fiscal year began on October 1. But the CR expires on December 11, and Congress will have to enact a new funding measure before the deadline to avoid a government shutdown.

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Latinas Deserve Fair Pay. It’s (Past) Time to Raise the Minimum Wage

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: October 08, 2014 at 09:09 am

October 8, 2014 is Latina Equal Pay Day and Matt Damon’s 44th birthday. Unfortunately, only one of those is an occasion for anyone to celebrate.

Last year, Latinas typically were paid just 56 cents for every dollar paid to white, non-Hispanic men. That’s why today, more than 10 months into 2014, we’re marking the day when Latinas have finally been paid the same amount that white, non-Hispanic men were typically paid in 2013 alone. You read that right: it takes more than 21 months for Latinas to make what white, non-Hispanic men made in 12.

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Without the Safety Net, Millions More Would Have Lived in Poverty in 2013

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: September 16, 2014 at 03:37 pm

I have good news and bad news. I’m the type who always wants to hear the bad news first, so here it is: newly released Census Bureau data show that more than 45 million Americans lived in poverty last year.

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