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Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy

Julie Vogtman is Director of Income Support Policy and Senior Counsel for the Family Economic Security Program at the National Women's Law Center. She works on a range of issues involving economic support for low-income women and their families, including minimum wage policies, unemployment benefits, and child care assistance. She also contributes to the Center’s work on federal budget and tax policies. Prior to joining the Center in 2010, Ms. Vogtman was an associate with Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, DC. She is a graduate of Furman University and Georgetown University Law Center.

My Take

What Do Offshore Corporate Tax Loopholes Cost Women and Families? A Lot.

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: April 05, 2013 at 01:47 pm

Tax Day (April 15) is nearly upon us. Maybe you’re scrambling to file, or maybe you’re happy to have a refund on the way. Whatever your feelings about your own taxes, it’s important to remember that taxes are essential to fund critical investments – everything from roads and bridges to education and life-saving scientific research.

But perhaps you’re thinking, “Wait a second. The roads where I live are crumbling, and the schools aren’t in such great shape either. And Washington just cut funding we need to improve our roads and our schools and help families who are struggling. I don’t think our tax code is working the way it should.” Well… you’re right. The tax code contains a bunch of special-interest loopholes and preferences that are used by the wealthy and big corporations to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. Some of the richest Americans pay a lower tax rate than middle-class families do, and some very profitable corporations manage to pay no federal income tax at all.  

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New York Raises Its Minimum Wage (For a Price) and the Fight Continues in Other States

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: April 01, 2013 at 04:48 pm

There’s a lot to report on the minimum wage today, but I’ll start with the biggest news: the New York legislature has approved the state’s 2013-2014 budget, which includes a minimum wage increase. Specifically, the minimum wage will rise from $7.25 to $8.00 per hour on December 31, 2013, to $8.75 one year later, and $9.00 on December 31, 2015.

This is good news for minimum wage workers in New York, nearly two-thirds of whom are women. But the phased-in minimum wage increase in the budget is weaker than the increase that the state Assembly passed just a few weeks ago, which would have raised New York’s minimum wage to $9.00 per hour in one step in January 2014, then indexed the wage annually to keep up with inflation. The budget also drops a provision in the Assembly-passed bill that would have raised the minimum cash wage for tipped food service workers from $5.00 to $6.21 per hour, but it does provide a path to an increase for these workers by authorizing the labor commissioner to have a wage board examine the adequacy of New York’s tipped minimum wage, then issue an order to raise the wage.

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Watch the Video: Tax Issues Are Women’s Issues, Too

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: March 29, 2013 at 01:33 pm

Did you see the first video from NWLC and the National Priorities Project explaining why budget and tax issues are women’s issues? No? Then stop what you’re doing and watch it here.

Now that you’ve seen it, you’re eager for more, right? Well, my friend, you’re in luck. In Part 2, you’ll learn how Congress can protect programs that serve women and families by requiring the wealthy and large corporations to pay their fair share of taxes. Watch the second video now:

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Watch the Video: Budget Issues Are Women’s Issues

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: March 29, 2013 at 01:20 pm

After a couple of weeks of intense debate over budget plans proposed in the House and Senate, you may feel that this week’s Congressional recess is a welcome break from talk of taxes and spending, deficits and debt. But Congress is back in session April 8 – and the budget battles will return, too.

 

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Government Shutdown Averted, but Harmful Cuts Will Continue

Posted by Julie Vogtman, Senior Counsel and Director of Income Support Policy | Posted on: March 21, 2013 at 04:05 pm

I’m not sure whether it counts as good news to report that Congress carried out one of its most basic responsibilities today by ensuring that the government will continue to function for the rest of FY 2013 — but it’s certainly better than reporting a government shutdown beginning next week. 

Today, the House of Representatives approved the continuing resolution (CR) passed yesterday by the Senate, averting a potential shutdown by funding government operations through the end of the fiscal year (September 30, 2013). (The CR passed last September will expire on March 27.) The bill largely maintains current funding levels, further reduced by the full $85 billion in cuts from the “sequester,” which means many programs and services that women and their families depend on remain subject to cuts — and hundreds of thousands of jobs are still likely to be lost, slowing our economic recovery.  

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