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Katherine Gallagher Robbins, Senior Policy Analyst

Katherine Gallagher Robbins

Katherine Gallagher Robbins is a Senior Policy Analyst for Family Economic Security at the National Women’s Law Center where she examines how tax and budget policies influence the financial stability and security of low-income women and families.  Before joining the Center in 2010, Ms. Gallagher Robbins worked as an organizer for the California Public Interest Research Group at the University of California, San Diego. She is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a graduate of the College of William and Mary.

My Take

The Minimum Wage Goes Up in D.C. and California Today

Posted by Katherine Gallagher Robbins, Senior Policy Analyst | Posted on: July 01, 2014 at 01:43 pm

Good news for minimum wage workers in Washington, D.C. and California—they just got a raise.

In D.C. the minimum wage increased to $9.50 per hour, up from $8.25. It is scheduled to hit $11.50 per hour in July 2016 and increase with inflation after that.

This increase is good news for women, who are about six in ten minimum wage workers in the District. And while $9.50 per hour isn’t nearly enough, a mom with two children who works full-time, year-round for the minimum wage now, finally, makes enough to be above the poverty line.

Unfortunately not all minimum wage workers in D.C. can celebrate today—the cash wage for tipped workers was not raised by in the legislation passed last January, meaning the cash wage for tipped workers in D.C.—about half of whom are women—remains a shockingly low $2.77 per hour.

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Five Facts about Working Mothers for Mother's Equal Pay Day

Posted by | Posted on: June 06, 2014 at 03:29 pm

Hallmark doesn’t make a card to give mothers on June 12th – but they should. June 12th is Mother’s Equal Pay Day—the day that marks how far mothers have to work into this year (in addition to working all of last year) to earn as much as fathers did last year alone.

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Nearly 1 in 5 Working Mothers With Young Children Work In Low-Wage Jobs

Posted by Katherine Gallagher Robbins, Senior Policy Analyst | Posted on: April 30, 2014 at 11:29 am

We all know it is tough to be a working mom with young children – but a new NWLC analysis shows that some moms face particular challenges as breadwinners and caregivers.  They work in low-wage jobs, so it’s difficult to earn enough to meet children’s basic needs, such as a home in a sa Read more...

Low-Wage Jobs, High-Cost Child Care, and Stay-at-Home Moms

The percentage of mothers who stayed at home increased from a low of 23 percent in 1999 to 29 percent in 2012, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center [PDF]. This represents a turn-around from the trend in previous decades, when the percentage of mothers who stayed at home steadily declined from 47 percent in 1970.

There are many possible explanations for the recent increase in the number of mothers staying at home—but economic factors clearly play a major part.

Women deciding to enter today’s labor force face daunting prospects—unemployment rates remain well above pre-recession levels and jobs are hard to come by. In fact, Pew reports that the share of women who stay home with their children because they cannot find a job has risen by five percentage points since 2000. And when jobs can be found, they are very low-wage. NWLC analysis shows that over one-third of women’s job gains [PDF] since 2009 have been in the 10 largest low-wage occupations, which typically pay $10.10 or less per hour. 

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Today Isn't Equal Pay Day for All Women

Posted by | Posted on: April 08, 2014 at 10:29 am

Today is finally Equal Pay Day– the day women have to work into 2014 (in addition to everything they earned in 2013) to earn what men made in 2013. While hardly cause for celebration, at least we finally got there, right?

Not so fast. While women overall reach Equal Pay Day in April, women of color still have a long way to go. That's because the wage gaps for women of color are substantially wider than for women overall: women overall working full time, year round typically make only 77 percent of what their male counterparts make – for African-American women compared to white, non-Hispanic men this figure is 64 cents – and for Hispanic women it's only 54 cents.

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