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Katherine Gallagher Robbins, Director of Research and Policy Analysis

Katherine Gallagher Robbins

Katherine Gallagher Robbins is Director of Research and Policy Analysis at the National Women’s Law Center where she oversees the Center's research with a primary focus on women's economic security and educational equity. Before joining the Center in 2010, Ms. Gallagher Robbins worked as an organizer for the California Public Interest Research Group at the University of California, San Diego. She is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a graduate of the College of William and Mary.

My Take

It's Time for a $12 Minimum Wage

Millions of workersmostly womenstruggle to make ends meet on minimum wage earnings. A new bill scheduled to be introduced tomorrow, the Raise the Wage Act, would significantly help these workers by increasing the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $12.00 per hour by 2020, then indexing it to keep pace with wages overall. The bill would also eliminate the federal minimum cash wage for tipped workers by gradually raising it until it is equal to the regular minimum wage. 

Here are five fast facts from our new analysis on why establishing one fair—and much higher!—minimum wage is important for women:

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Six Facts about Equal Pay on the Sixth Anniversary of Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act

Posted by Katherine Gallagher Robbins, Director of Research and Policy Analysis | Posted on: January 29, 2015 at 11:09 am

Today marks six years since President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act into law. This law restores important protections against pay discrimination which were stripped away in the Supreme Court’s decision in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. and is a critical step in the fight to close the wage gap. But the fight is far from finished. Here are six facts that show how much farther we still have to go:*

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Minimum Wage Rates Go Up In 20 States to start 2015, Increasing Wages for More than 3.1 Million Workers

The minimum wage went up in 20 states on January 1st. South Dakota had the largest boost of $1.25 per hour thanks to South Dakota voters, who overwhelmingly approved the wage increase on the state’s ballot in November. Arkansas and Nebraska also saw their minimum wages increase on the 1st as a result of successful ballot initiatives, while workers in Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and West Virginia got raises due to legislative action. Minimum wages in the other nine states—Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, and Washington—increased automatically because they are indexed to inflation, a policy that ensures the minimum wage keeps pace with the rising cost of living. Workers in Alaska, D.C., Delaware and Minnesota are set to get raises later in 2015.

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Ten Key Research Findings on Women & Families in 2014

Posted by Katherine Gallagher Robbins, Director of Research and Policy Analysis | Posted on: December 17, 2014 at 03:43 pm

We’ve done a lot of research in 2014 on women and families.  Here are ten striking findings from the past year:

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Putting a Value on Caregiving

Posted by Katherine Gallagher Robbins, Director of Research and Policy Analysis | Posted on: November 13, 2014 at 02:24 pm

Everyone knows that raising children is pricey—the USDA estimates it costs nearly $250,000 to raise one child to adulthood (not even counting college!).  But what you might not know is how much all the time and effort parents put in to childrearing is worth to our economy. This is because the value of unpaid caregiving and childrearing—the lion’s share of which is done by women—is largely unrecognized and rarely quantified.

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