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State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: Indiana

•    Income eligibility limit: In 2010, a family of three in Indiana could qualify for child care assistance with an annual income up to $23,256 (127 percent of poverty, 40 percent of state median income).1

•    Waiting list: Indiana had 11,622 children on the waiting list for child care assistance as of February 2010.

•    Parent copayments: In 2010, a family of three with an income at 100 percent of poverty ($18,310 a year) receiving child care assistance had no copayment. A family of three with an income at 150 percent of poverty ($27,465 a year) receiving child care assistance paid $170 per month, or 7 percent of its income in copayments.2

•    Reimbursement rates: In 2010, Indiana’s reimbursement rates for child care providers serving families receiving child care assistance were below the federally recommended level—the 75th percentile of current market rates, which is the level designed to give families access to 75 percent of the providers in their community.
o    Indiana’s monthly reimbursement rate for center care for a four-year-old in Marion County was $43, or 6 percent, below the 75th percentile of current market rates for this type of care.
o    Indiana’s monthly reimbursement rate for center care for a one-year-old in Marion County was $52, or 6 percent, below the 75th percentile of current market rates for this type of care.

•    Tiered reimbursement rates: In 2010, Indiana paid higher reimbursement rates for higher-quality care.
o    The reimbursement rate for center care for a four-year-old in Marion County at the highest quality tier was 10 percent higher than the rate at the lowest quality tier.
o    The reimbursement rate for center care for a four-year-old in Marion County at the highest quality tier was above the 75th percentile of current market rates.

•    Eligibility for parents searching for a job: In 2010, Indiana allowed parents to continue receiving child care for up to 13 weeks while searching for a job.  However, Indiana did not allow parents to qualify for child care assistance while searching for a job.

 

1In 2010, families already receiving assistance could continue doing so until their income reached $31,128.
2Copayments vary depending on how long the family has been receiving child care assistance, with families paying a higher percentage of income the longer they receive assistance. These copayments assume it is the first year the family is receiving assistance.

 

Source: Karen Schulman and Helen Blank, State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: New Federal Funds Help States Weather the Storm (Washington, DC: National Women’s Law Center, 2010). These data reflect policies as of February 2010, unless otherwise indicated.