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State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: South Dakota

•    Income eligibility limit: In 2010, a family of three in South Dakota could qualify for child care assistance with an annual income up to $38,150 (208 percent of poverty, 70 percent of state median income).1

•    Waiting list: South Dakota had no waiting list for child care assistance as of February 2010.     

•    Parent copayments: In 2010, a family of three with an income at 100 percent of poverty ($18,310 a year) receiving child care assistance had no copayment. A family of three with an income at 150 percent of poverty ($27,465 a year) receiving child care assistance paid $172 per month, or 7 percent of its income in copayments.

•    Reimbursement rates: In 2010, South Dakota’s reimbursement rates for child care providers serving families receiving child care assistance were at the federally recommended level—the 75th percentile of current market rates, which is the level designed to give families access to 75 percent of the providers in their community.

•    Tiered reimbursement rates: In 2010, South Dakota did not pay higher reimbursement rates for higher-quality care.

•    Eligibility for parents searching for a job: In 2010, South Dakota allowed parents to qualify for or continue receiving child care assistance for up to 2 months while searching for a job.2 

 

1This income limit takes into account that the state disregards 4 percent of earned income in determining eligibility. The stated income limit, in policy, was $36,624 in 2010.
2The state’s standard policy allows parents receiving child care assistance to continue to receive it while searching for a job for up to 30 days. The state is using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to also allow parents applying for or receiving child care assistance to receive it while searching for a job for up to 2 months; this policy went into effect as of June 2009.

 

Source: Karen Schulman and Helen Blank, State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: New Federal Funds Help States Weather the Storm (Washington, DC: National Women’s Law Center, 2010). These data reflect policies as of February 2010, unless otherwise indicated.