Skip to contentNational Women's Law Center

State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: Texas

•    Income eligibility limit: In 2010, local workforce development boards in Texas could set the income limit for a family of three to qualify for child care assistance between $27,465 a year (150 percent of poverty, 52 percent of state median income) and $44,524 a year (243 percent of poverty, 85 percent of state median income).1

•    Waiting list: Texas had 11,572 children on the waiting list for child care assistance as of March 2010.2  

•    Parent copayments: In 2010, a family of three with an income at 100 percent of poverty ($18,310 a year) receiving child care assistance paid $76 to $167 per month, or 5 to 11 percent of its income in copayments. A family of three with an income at 150 percent of poverty ($27,465 a year) receiving child care assistance paid $114 to $251 per month, or 5 to 11 percent of its income in copayments.3

•    Reimbursement rates: In 2010, Texas’s reimbursement rates for child care providers serving families receiving child care assistance were below the federally recommended level—the 75th percentile of current market rates, which is the level designed to give families access to 75 percent of the providers in their community.4 
o    The monthly reimbursement rate for center care for a four-year-old in the Gulf Coast Workforce Development Area was $233, or 34 percent, below the 75th percentile of current market rates for this type of care.
o    The monthly reimbursement rate for center care for a one-year-old in the Gulf Coast Workforce Development Area was $361, or 39 percent, below the 75th percentile of current market rates for this type of care.

•    Tiered reimbursement rates: In 2010, Texas paid higher reimbursement rates for higher-quality care.
o    The reimbursement rate for center care for a four-year-old in the Gulf Coast Workforce Development Area at the highest quality tier was 6 percent higher than the rate at the lowest quality tier.
o    The reimbursement rate for center care for a four-year-old in the Gulf Coast Workforce Development Area at the highest quality tier was still below the 75th percentile of current market rates.

•    Eligibility for parents searching for a job: In 2010, Texas allowed parents to continue receiving child care for up to 4 weeks in a federal fiscal year while searching for a job. However, Texas did not allow parents to qualify for child care assistance while searching for a job. 

 

1Local workforce development boards set their own income limits within state guidelines. Some local boards allow families an extended year of child care assistance up to a higher income than the initial eligibility limit; however, the exit eligibility limit cannot exceed 85 percent of state median income. As of October 2010, the maximum income at which local boards can set their eligibility limits increased to $46,658 to adjust for the 2011 state median income estimate.
2Local workforce development boards maintain waiting lists. This total represents the aggregate number of children on waiting lists across all boards. In addition, some boards have frozen intake.
3Local workforce development boards set their own copayments within state guidelines. Also note that parents participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) work program (Choices) and the Food Stamp Employment and Training program are exempt from the copayment.
4Local workforce development boards determine reimbursement rates at their own discretion. The average maximum rates across board areas range from the 23rd to the 88th percentile of market rates.

 

Source: Karen Schulman and Helen Blank, State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: New Federal Funds Help States Weather the Storm (Washington, DC: National Women’s Law Center, 2010). These data reflect policies as of February 2010, unless otherwise indicated.