Skip to contentNational Women's Law Center

Child Care

Too Much At Risk: Ryan Poverty Plan Puts Children Needing Early Learning at Risk

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) released his plan to combat poverty this morning. It flies in the face of the strong support that the public has expressed for increasing investments in early learning. Read more »

Can Your Family Live on the Minimum Wage? Mine Can't.

Today is July 24th – five years to the day since the federal minimum wage last went up. At $7.25 per hour, the current minimum wage typically leaves a full-time worker with just $77 per week to spend after accounting for housing costs and taxes. To shed light on what that kind of income really means for working families, advocates across the country, including NWLC, are promoting the “Live the Wage” challenge. From today through July 30, participants in the challenge will attempt to live on a minimum wage budget – just $77 to cover food, transportation, and other expenses for the entire week.

The Live the Wage challenge presents an important opportunity to grasp the daily struggles facing low-wage workers, and I hope huge numbers participate. But for me, I know taking the challenge means failure on the very first day. That’s because I’m a new mom, just recently back at work, and I have a staggering new expense in my weekly budget: child care. Read more »

Even Presidents' Children Need Child Care

Parents across America think and talk about child care every day. It isn’t every day, though, that the President, Vice President, First Lady, and former Speaker of the House all talk about child care—but that’s exactly what they all did at yesterday’s White House Summit on Working Families. They shared their own past experiences struggling to work while ensuring their children were well cared for. Michelle Obama spoke about the time years ago (before entering the White House) when her carefully constructed balance between work and family fell apart when her trusted child care provider left to find a better-paying job. Nancy Pelosi reminisced about her experiences raising five young children born six years apart. The speakers went on to emphasize the need to help other parents—especially those dealing with much more challenging circumstances than their own—find and afford high-quality child care.

At the Summit, a broad range of policy makers, business leaders, workers, and advocates—including National Women’s Law Center Co-President Nancy Duff Campbell, who spoke on a panel on caregiving—highlighted how high-quality child care and early education benefits all of us. It enables parents to get and keep a job and work with peace of mind that their children are in safe, nurturing settings. It enables children to learn and grow and prepares them for success in school and in life. It gives businesses more loyal, more productive employees, which boosts profits. All of these benefits combine to produce a stronger economy, now and in the future. Read more »

Parents in Low-Wage Jobs Share Their Struggles Finding Child Care and Making Ends Meet

Women make up 76 percent of workers in the 10 largest low-wage occupations and they shoulder the lion’s share of caregiving responsibilities for children. Yet working parents in low-wage jobs – most of whom are women – face significant obstacles to securing child care that is stable, high-quality, and affordable. The Ms. Foundation is supporting an effort by six worker justice organizations – Adhikaar for Human Rights and Social Justice, the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, the Garment Worker Center, the Retail Action Project and Center for Frontline Retail, and Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United – and the National Women’s Law Center to examine the working conditions in low-wage jobs that make it so difficult to arrange child care.

Together, we’re releasing a preliminary report with survey and focus group findings from participatory research conducted by the worker justice organizations that illuminate these challenges – along with preliminary ideas about where we go from here. Read the report here. Read more »

Addressing the Challenges of Child Care

As the White House Summit on Working Families draws near, we’re looking forward to this opportunity to highlight not only how crucial child care is to the success of working parents but also the challenges parents — particularly low-income parents — face in finding and affording high-quality care. 

While parents are at work, they think about how their kids are doing. They need the peace of mind that comes with knowing that their children are in a safe, nurturing environment. They need to know that their children are developing the social and learning skills that they need to be successful in school and in life. In short, they need high-quality child care. Yet many parents cannot afford it. Full-time child care for one child can average $4,000 to $16,000 a year [PDF], depending on where the family lives, the age of the child, and the type of care. 

The cost of child care is especially burdensome for parents working low-wage jobs. Nearly one in five working mothers with very young children work in low-wage jobs and about one-third of these mothers are poor. These low-wage workers not only lack the resources to afford high-quality early learning programs but often have unstable and unpredictable schedules or work during nights and weekends. Read more »

Way to Go Colorado! Much Needed Child Care Assistance Signed into Law in the Centennial State

Newsflash: Child care is expensive

In a majority of states, the cost of child care for an infant exceeds the cost of public college tuition.  That cost pinches the wallets of all families with young children in paid child care.  For low-income families, it’s much more than a pinch—on average, families in poverty who pay for care spend nearly one-third of their income on that care.

Child care costs in Colorado are particularly high relative to median income—on this measure, Colorado ranks among the least affordable.  But parents will have help with these costs thanks to new state legislation signed into law last month.  These new laws will offer much-needed assistance to low-income families with young children.    Read more »

Why Every Child Needs a Strong Start

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this one explains pretty clearly why every child needs a strong start:

Morning Assignment

 

My oldest son has been going to family child care since he was about 6 months old.  Three years later, he’s still there (joined by his younger brother) and as you might be able to tell based on the above photo, he’s doing very well!  His teacher recently sent this to me after my big boy completed one of his morning assignments – he had to fill in missing letters in words.  Needless to say I was even more proud of him than usual.  And when I saw him later that day, he was beaming with pride himself!

Read more »

Low-Wage Jobs, High-Cost Child Care, and Stay-at-Home Moms

The percentage of mothers who stayed at home increased from a low of 23 percent in 1999 to 29 percent in 2012, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center [PDF]. This represents a turn-around from the trend in previous decades, when the percentage of mothers who stayed at home steadily declined from 47 percent in 1970.

There are many possible explanations for the recent increase in the number of mothers staying at home—but economic factors clearly play a major part.

Women deciding to enter today’s labor force face daunting prospects—unemployment rates remain well above pre-recession levels and jobs are hard to come by. In fact, Pew reports that the share of women who stay home with their children because they cannot find a job has risen by five percentage points since 2000. And when jobs can be found, they are very low-wage. NWLC analysis shows that over one-third of women’s job gains [PDF] since 2009 have been in the 10 largest low-wage occupations, which typically pay $10.10 or less per hour.  Read more »

The Sweet Reality of a 23 Cent per Hour Raise

Women only make 77 cents for every dollar that a man makes. Big deal?

The biggest.

Twenty-three cents may not sound like much, but for me, that change would add up – and it would have a meaningful impact.  Here’s how:

  • With a 23-cent raise for every dollar I earn, I could pay off my student loans in less than two years, compared with the 7 years that it will take me now. But I’m not all business. Maybe I wouldn’t spend the entire raise on student loans – maybe I’d eat out somewhere nice, treat myself to a new book, or buy a train ticket for a weekend away. Even if I spent just half of this increased income repaying my loan debt, it would shave off four years of monthly payments. And if I wanted to be the responsible adult my parents keep telling me to be, I could forgo (some of) that fun and use the other half to put away monthly retirement savings, something I cannot currently afford to do.

Child Care and Head Start Success Stories Show Need for More Investment - Not Cuts

Congressman Paul Ryan released his budget blueprint today and, although it does not provide detailed proposals on funding for each federal program, his budget would severely reduce overall discretionary funding, a category that encompasses many programs that benefit women and their families.  Meeting Ryan’s budget targets would likely require deep cuts in programs such as child care assistance and Head Start—programs that enable families to make ends meet and to ultimately improve their lives.  The positive impacts of these and other supports  are vividly illustrated by the stories collected in a new booklet by Half in Ten.  Our American Story: Personal Stories on the War on Poverty’s Legacy [PDF] compiles the stories of 30 individuals who have been helped by programs that have given parents the chance to work and obtain education credentials that enable them to gain more stable and better-paying employment, and that have given their children learning opportunities they need to succeed in the future.

In one of these stories, Rebecca of Barnesville, Minnesota describes how she and her family have succeeded thanks to safety net programs: Read more »