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Child Care

Young Parents Need Access to Affordable Child Care to Succeed in School

Do you remember the demands on your time when you were a high school student? Classes, homework, maybe college applications. Maybe you had a part-time job. Maybe you participated in after-school activities or played on a school sports team.

For expectant and parenting students, the demands are much greater. At a briefing earlier this summer, Leydi Bautista, a young mother, explained that “you have to be three persons in one day”: parent, student, and worker. In the U.S., roughly one in four girls becomes pregnant at least once before age 20 [PDF]. For Latinas, the rates are higher: one in three Latinas becomes pregnant at least once by her 20th birthday [PDF]. This week marks the 6th Annual Latina Week of Action for Reproductive Health. One of the ways we can honor the week and respect all young people’s reproductive health decisions is to provide supports, including child care, for parenting students. Read more »

Yes, Child Care Needs Reform — And Funding

On Wednesday, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education marked up a bill that would include major cuts to programs that are critical to women and their families. The Child Care Development Block Grant (CCDBG) escaped without being cut—but it already falls short of meeting families’ needs. Moreover, the bill provides no new funding to meet the important goals of child care legislation passed with overwhelming bipartisan support just last November.

Resources Don’t Match Goals Read more »

Tax Day News: Louisiana's Unique Tax Credits Improve Child Care Quality

Louisiana’s unique package of tax credits, the first of its kind in the country, improved the quality of child care in the state in its first four years — including for low-income children — according to a new report just released by the National Women’s Law Center. The report assesses the effectiveness of the credits, known collectively as the School Readiness Tax Credits (SRTC), in improving child care quality in the first four years of their implementation. Between 2008, when the credits took effect, and 2011, the credits provided more than $38 million in new investments in child care quality. Over the same period, there were measurable improvements in the quality of child care in Louisiana. Read more »

Support Young Hearts and Minds: Invest In Child Care

Valentine’s Day may still be a few weeks away, but child care advocates across the country are already busy with a project to bring attention to the importance of child care and early learning. The project? Making valentines to the U.S. Senate that highlight the importance of investing in high-quality, affordable child care.  This project is part of an effort by NWLC, national partners, and child care advocates across the country to ensure that Congress understands the need for new funding to successfully implement the new Child Care and Development Block Grant reauthorization law. Read more »

President Obama Proposes Significant New Investments in Child Care

Last week was a big week for child care and early education. On Saturday, the White House announced a proposal for a fairer tax code that invests in middle-class families, including an expansion of the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC). On Tuesday, President Obama emphasized the importance of child care during his State of the Union address, saying that it’s time we stop treating child care as a side issue, or as a women’s issue, and treat it like the national economic priority that it is for all of us. And on Thursday, the President announced a major new proposal to make high-quality child care available for all infants and toddlers in low- and moderate income families, and highlighted the proposal during a visit to a Head Start center and a speech in Lawrence, Kansas. The expanded child care tax credit and child care assistance proposals would be paid for by making very wealthy investors pay their fair share of taxes and fees on large financial institutions. Read more »

Child Care Workers Still Not Earning What They're Worth

Child care workers’ wages have barely grown over the past 25 years, and are among the lowest of all occupations, according to a report released today by the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment. The report, Worthy Work, STILL Unlivable Wages: The Early Childhood Workforce 25 Years after the National Child Care Staffing Study, found that the average hourly wage for child care workers in 2013 was $10.33, which was just 1 percent higher than in 1997 after adjusting for inflation.

According to the report, preschool teachers earn slightly higher wages than child care workers—$15.11 an hour on average—and these wages have grown by 15 percent since 2013 after adjusting for inflation. Yet preschool teachers still earn less than kindergarten teachers (who earn an average hourly wage of $25.40) as well as about 80 percent of other occupations. This difference in salaries is not completely explained by a difference in education levels. While preschool teachers with a bachelor’s degree earn more than preschool teachers with only an associate’s or high school degree, they still earn less than kindergarten teachers with a bachelor’s degree. Read more »

Putting a Value on Caregiving

Everyone knows that raising children is pricey—the USDA estimates it costs nearly $250,000 to raise one child to adulthood (not even counting college!).  But what you might not know is how much all the time and effort parents put in to childrearing is worth to our economy. This is because the value of unpaid caregiving and childrearing—the lion’s share of which is done by women—is largely unrecognized and rarely quantified. Read more »

Turning the Corner on Child Care Assistance — But Still A Long Way to Go

Families in thirty-three states were better off—having greater access to child care assistance to help pay for care and/or receiving greater benefits from assistance—in February 2014 than in February 2013 under one or more key child care assistance policies, according to a new report by the National Women’s Law Center. The report, Turning the Corner: State Child Care Assistance Policies 2014, also found that families in thirteen states were worse off under one or more of these policies in February 2014 than in February 2013.

This year is the second year in a row in which the situation for families improved in more states than it worsened. And it represents a turnaround from the previous two years, when the situation worsened for families in more states than it improved. However, the improvements states made between 2013 and 2014 were generally modest and families still lack the help they need to afford reliable, good-quality care. Read more »

Instability at Work Wreaks Havoc on Moms and Children

Have you ever heard of “clopening?” It’s when a worker has to close up the shop, store, or restaurant where they work late at night and then report for an early-morning shift just a few hours later. Stressful scheduling like clopening frequently occurs when employers use scheduling software designed to maximize profits—often at the expense of working mothers and their children. This week, the New York Times featured a front-page profile of Jannette Navarro, a mom who works as a barista at a Starbucks in New York City. Jannette’s story shows how the scheduling practices of major chains are unsustainable for moms who need child care, as well as highly detrimental to their children, who bear the brunt of a lack of stability.

The challenges for Jannette Navarro and many women like her begin with the scheduling software many companies use to determine employees’ shifts based on how much business they anticipate. This software enables companies to increase their profits by reducing labor costs, but it works, as the New York Times calls it, by “redistributing some of the uncertainty of doing business from corporations to families.” Jannette typically received her always-changing schedule just three days in advance, leaving very little time to arrange child care for her 4-year-old son, Gavin. While Gavin could attend a preschool program during the day, shifts early in the morning or later in the evening forced Jannette to scramble to get a friend or relative to take care of him—and Gavin’s child center is not open on weekends. Furthermore, Jannette worried about losing access to child care because of her work schedule, since Gavin’s eligibility depended on her working a minimum number of hours, and she was always at risk of not getting enough. Read more »

Lesson Learned: States’ Actions on Child Care and Early Learning Show Congress How It’s Done

On the child care and early education front, there have been some critical steps in the right direction in Washington – introduction of the Strong Start for America’s Children Act, Senate passage of a bill to reauthorize the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), and President Obama’s commitment to expanding access to early education. But there’s still more work to do to get legislation passed and new investments approved at the federal level. As members of Congress head home for their month-long recess, they should take the opportunity to see what is happening in their own states, many of which have been leading the way to make high-quality child care and early education programs more available and more responsive to families’ needs.

We’ve just released a new summary highlighting some key examples of states’ progress on early care and education in 2014. More than half of states took at least some steps forward on early care and education – increasing funding, redesigning policies to expand access, launching pilot programs, or improving child care tax credits.

Here are some examples of the creative approaches and strong commitments we’re seeing: Read more »