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Employment

Take It From POTUS: It’s Time to Lead on Leave

Yesterday, the White House announced  it would take important steps toward ensuring that workers have the right to earn up to seven paid sick days a year and paid family and medical leave to care for their families. Specifically, the White House plans to call on Congress to pass the Healthy Families Act and on states and cities to pass similar laws; provide new funding to help states design their own paid family and medical leave programs; and increase the paid sick days and family and medical leave benefits available to federal employees.

This initiative will help all workers, but will be especially meaningful to women who still shoulder the lion’s share of caregiving responsibilities. With more families counting on women’s wages than ever before, both women and men need to be able to take time off from work to welcome a new baby, to care for a sick child or elderly parent, or to address their own medical needs without suffering financial hardship as a result. As the President noted, “[N]o matter how sick they are, or how sick a family member is, they may find themselves having to choose to be able to buy groceries or pay the rent, or look after themselves or their children."  Read more »

Mach Mining v. EEOC: When Can an Employer Point Fingers to Avoid Defending Against a Discrimination Charge?

Today, the Supreme Court hears oral arguments in Mach Mining v. EEOC, a story about a woman who applied for a position as a miner with Mach Mining and filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) after she was denied the job. The EEOC investigated the company, and sued Mach Mining for systemic hiring discrimination against women on the basis that they have never hired a female miner. And yet the story being told at the Supreme Court today is not the one you think. It’s not about sex discrimination, it’s not about the company’s practices, it’s not about the fact that the share of women in the mining industry has remained shockingly low— less than one half of one percent—for decades, due in large part to the discrimination that blocks women from entering and staying in the field. Instead, the story is about whether the EEOC did enough to conciliate with Mach Mining before suing the company for sex discrimination, and whether that question is even reviewable by the courts. Conciliation is the process by which the EEOC must first attempt an informal resolution with the employer before filing a lawsuit in federal court. Read more »

Starve American Workers Act Is More Like It

Yesterday the House of Representatives passed H.R. 30, a bill to chip away at the Affordable Care Act’s requirement that employers provide health coverage for employees who work at least 30 hours a week, amending it so that employers would only be required to provide health insurance coverage to those who work 40 hours per week. Read more »

Save American Workers from H.R. 30

Tomorrow, the House of Representatives will be voting on H.R. 30, a bill that would change the Affordable Care Act’s definition of full-time work so that employers only have to offer health insurance to employees who regularly work 40 or more hours a week. Without this change, employers must offer coverage to employees who regularly work 30 or more hours a week.

These are four reasons H.R. 30 is bad for American women, American workers and American families. Read more »

When It Comes to Working Women, Young v. UPS May Finally Be the Court’s Chance to Get it Right

Cross-posted from the Alliance for Justice.

In the last couple of years, the Supreme Court has had a lot to say about working women. Unfortunately, none of it has been good.

In the past year and a half alone, the Court has made it harder for women to sue their employers for sexual harassment, limited the rights of home health care workers—who are nearly all women—to organize, and given bosses a religious trump card they can use to quash women’s rights to insurance coverage for birth control. But in the Young v. UPS case, which the Justices heard yesterday, the Court gets another chance to get it right.

Unfortunately, the Supreme Court’s recent record on working women shows just how blind the justices have been to the realities of the workplace. Read more »

The Historic New Rule on LGBT Rights: Federal Contractors Can’t Discriminate Based on Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity

More lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) couples across the country have the right to marry than ever before. It is a rude awakening, though, that many of these individuals may walk into work after returning from their honeymoon to find that they have been fired for being gay. Read more »

Why Peggy Young Should Win By A Landslide

Today, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Young v. UPS. When Peggy Young, a delivery driver for UPS, found out she was pregnant, her midwife recommended that she not lift more than 20 pounds—but UPS denied her request for light duty, even though it offered accommodations to other drivers with non-pregnancy related limitations.

Many Supreme Court cases are decided by a narrow 5-4 majority. But this particular case should not be one of those squeakers. Peggy Young should win by a landslide. Here’s why: Read more »

Workers Are United in Support of Peggy Young

In September, I attended a meeting of Respect the Bump, a group that formed when OurWalmart members began discussing online the troubles they had working at Walmart during their pregnancies. Women across the country told the same story; when they requested even minor accommodations for medical needs related to their pregnancies, Walmart denied the requests, forced them onto unpaid leave, or fired them. Walmart did this while accommodating workers with disabilities and on the job injuries. I was at the Respect the Bump meeting to conduct know-your-rights training with Elizabeth Gedmark of A Better Balance [PDF]. The women of Respect the Bump were charged with setting the agenda: we agreed to answer any questions they might have.

One of the topics the women were eager to discuss was Young v. UPS [PDF] and how they could help support the plaintiff, Peggy Young. The women were used to standing with other Walmart workers, but they told us they wanted to stand with Peggy Young as well. That’s because her case demonstrates just how widespread the problem of pregnancy discrimination remains. Read more »

Walmart Moms Stand for Respect

On Black Friday, Walmart workers across the country will be standing up for $15 an hour, full-time schedules, and respect at work -- workers like Sheena Kennedy.   

Sheena Read more »

What I Want for National Work and Family Month: Schedules that Work!

As we close out National Work & Family month, it’s a good time to take stock of the strides made so far this year in the fight for fair schedules for working families. July saw the introduction of the federal Schedules that Work Act which would provide workers with more predictable and stable schedules, as well as a say in when they work. San Francisco stepped up to the plate next, with the Retail Workers Bill of Rights which would ensure fair scheduling practices and stable incomes for employees in the city’s chain fast food restaurants and retail stores. And earlier this summer, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer held a public forum on workers’ need for a voice in their schedules. Not to be outdone, a state senator in Michigan just introduced a fair scheduling bill [PDF] a couple of weeks ago. Read more »