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Wage Gap

A Long Hard Look in the Mirror: the Wage Gap for Latinas

New NWLC analysis shows that in 2013, Latinas typically made only 56 percent of what white, non-Hispanic men earned. That’s 56 cents for every dollar, amounting to an annual difference of $23,279. So, on December 31, 2013, while white, non-Hispanic men who worked full time, year round were typically paid $53,488 for the year, Latinas were typically paid just $30,209. Today, more than 10 months into 2014, we’re marking the day when Latinas have finally been paid the same amount that white, non-Hispanic men were typically paid in 2013 alone. That’s right; it takes over 21 months for Latinas to earn what white, non-Hispanic men earn in 12. 21 months versus 12 – that’s not a very pretty reflection. Read more »

Louisiana Has the Largest Wage Gap, D.C. Has the Smallest in 2013

Today the Census released new state-level data on income in 2013. We’ve been crunching numbers on the wage gap—here the key facts you need to know: Read more »

7 Signs the Wage Gap is Played Out

The wage gap barely budged in over a decade and the latest data show that women working full time, year round only make 78 cents for every dollar a man makes.To give you an idea of how long ago that is, here are some things that were popular back in the early 2000’s.

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How the Wage Gap Hurts Working Families & What Can Be Done to Close It

Another year, another $10,876 lost. That’s how much a woman working full time, year round was typically underpaid compared to her male counterpart in 2013, according to NWLC analysis of new Census Bureau data.

Our analysis shows that women in full-time, year-round jobs make 78 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts—about the same as last year’s figure of 77 cents. The wage gap for women of color is even larger—with African American women making 64 cents and Latinas making 56 cents to their white, male, non-Latino counterparts’ dollar. Read more »

The Story Behind the Numbers: The Wage Gap

Tomorrow, the Census Bureau will release new data on poverty, income, and health insurance in the U.S. in 2013. As we get ready to crunch numbers, we thought it would be helpful to take a deeper look at what these numbers tell us — and don’t tell us — about the wage gap.

The typical American woman who works full time, year round was still paid only 77 cents for every dollar paid to her male counterpart in 2012. For women of color, the gaps are even larger. This blog post provides details about the wage gap measure that the Census Bureau and the National Women’s Law Center use, factors contributing to the wage gap, and how to shrink the gap. Read more »

One Step Closer to Passing the Paycheck Fairness Act

Today the Senate, by a vote of 73-25, agreed to move on to a full debate of the Paycheck Fairness Act (PFA). But we’re not at the finish line just yet—in fact, we’re far from it. There will be another procedural vote before the Senate finally gets to the point and hopefully passes PFA.

Passing PFA would make a big difference for working women. Here’s how: Read more »

Closing the Wage Gap at Gap

Equal pay is achievable – just ask Gap Inc. Earlier this week the company announced that that it is paying men and women equally for work on the same jobs. It worked with a consulting firm to evaluate its pay practices and confirm pay parity between the sexes. The company also revealed that it is ahead of the curve in terms of its numbers of women in leadership positions.

Gap’s success in maintaining equal pay is all the more striking when you consider that women working in the retail sector as a whole experienced a 32 cent wage gap compared to their male counterparts in 2011. This gap for the retail sector is much larger than the overall wage gap between men and women. Read more »

Montana State Government Leads the Way on Equal Pay with Self-Evaluation of Employee Compensation

There is both good news and bad news for women who work for the state of Montana.

Last week the state released the results of a pay equity audit [PDF] that was conducted by the executive branch of the state government – an in-depth analysis of pay practices to understand and identify possible solutions to gender-based pay disparities. The audit found that the female state government employees covered by the pay audit earned on average approximately 86 percent of what male state government employees earned. Read more »

Women’s Economic Opportunities: We’ve Come a Long Way, But We’re Not There Yet

A friend of mine is bringing a group of middle schoolers to D.C. next month for a field trip about inequality and social justice. She asked if I knew of any good resources about the economic challenges women face. As it turns out, yes. Yes, I do.

From poverty and low-wage work to retirement savings, women face unique obstacles in providing for themselves and their families in the United States. Earlier this week, the Senate Budget Committee held a hearing on expanding economic opportunities for women and, with Senator Patty Murray leading the way, the conversation focused on the valuable contributions women have made to the economic security of their families and their country – and the need to remove barriers that still lie in the way. Read more »

How Jill Abramson Brings the Equal Pay Conversation to the New York Times

Since Wednesday this week, media sources have been asking why Jill Abramson was fired from her job as executive editor of the New York Times. Articles suggest that Abramson discovered that her pay and pension benefits were significantly less than the pay and pension benefits of the male editors who held both the executive editor and managing editors roles before her. Abramson raised her unequal pay with the higher ups, and according to sources, was then fired a few weeks later. Read more »